PTSD

It is extremely difficult to see your child going through intense stress and anxiety caused by a traumatic event. If you were involved in the traumatic event yourself and are also experiencing symptoms of PTSD, it is crucial you also seek help if you feel it necessary and seek support from other family members if you are able to.

Children or young people who experience PTSD often endure flashbacks caused by triggers that remind them of the traumatic event. A trigger can be anything from a smell, taste, environment, or person. During a flashback, a child can feel extremely distressed and panicked as they can often see, smell and feel how they felt during the traumatic event, causing them to relive the experience.

If your child is experiencing a flashback caused by a trigger you can ease them by helping them stay grounded and mindful of the here and now.

Although children and young people with PTSD don’t often talk about their traumatic experiences, young children will often draw or re-enact the scarring event. It is best to approach the child to have a conversation about how they feel and what they’re experiencing, as they will not bring it up with you directly as it is too painful, and the child may be actively trying to repress the event. Do not attempt to talk about the event during a flashback or trigger as this will cause more harm – wait till the child is calmer and respect their boundaries if they do not want to talk about it.

If your child experiences severe PTSD symptoms for over a month, contact a Special Educational Needs Co-Ordinator (SENCO) or a mental health professional.

To learn more, watch our informational film on PTSD in children and our video of real-life accounts PTSD and Me.

Watch our Films

PTSD in Children

Exposure to traumatic events is very common in young people.  After a trauma a child may feel distressed, tearful or in shock.  In most cases they will recover well with family support but if these feelings persist, they may have developed Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). This film explains how to identify and help a child showing the symptoms of PTSD.

Read and download our fact sheets, watch more videos or sign up for our mailing list and free interactive guide.

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PTSD and Me : Real Life Child Mental Health Experiences

Please note – some images and content may be upsetting or disturbing. This film is not intended to be watched by children.

This short film features real life accounts of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) experienced by young people. Through their words we see the importance of early intervention by parents and teachers.

Exposure to traumatic events is very common in young people. After a trauma a child may feel distressed, tearful or in shock. In most cases they will recover well with family support but if these feelings persist, they may have developed Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

Nip in the Bud strongly believes that early intervention and support for children ensures far better outcomes.

Read and download our fact sheets, watch more videos or sign up for our mailing list and free interactive guide.

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How to Recognise Symptoms of PTSD

Read and download our fact sheets, watch more videos or sign up for our mailing list and free interactive guide.

Watch Now